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Writing Tips, Editing Tips and Writing Prompts

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Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection

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Prompt 626 – First Line
Tag – First Line
“Who did you just invite to dinner?”

Prompt 627 – Creative
Tag – Trainee
Your boss has hired someone to help out as you prepare to go into the busy season at work. However, the trainee has never done anything like your job and you have exactly one day to train them. What happens?


Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I've received quite a few editing tips from our membership. Today, we're going to look at some provided by JayT. Enjoy!

 


 

There are three common editing issues that I come across frequently. They are punctuation (ie. missing commas, misused commas, and dialogue punctuation), misused words (ie nauseous instead of nauseated, then/than misused, they're, their, there misused), and sentences that don't read correctly and interrupt the flow of the story (they can be fragmented sentences, run-on sentences, or sentences that are structured incorrectly). 

 

Commas can be the bane of both a writer's and an editor's existence. I've found that writers will either totally ignore using a comma because they're not certain where to place them or they'll overuse the comma and randomly place it where it does not belong. There are several resources on this site and out on the internet that will help writers when it comes to comma usage.  Additionally, there is a blog on this site about proper dialogue punctuation.

 

The next common editing issue that I've often encountered would be the misused words. An easy example of this would be they're/their/there. They're is a contraction for they are, meaning the only time a writer would use they're is when they combine the words they are. Their is used when referring to a group of other people. Finally, there is used when referencing a location. Some common misused words would be then and than, break and brake, neither/nor and either/or, and finally nauseous and nauseated. Then is used when you are referring to whatever will happen next. An example would be- When I get home from work, I change clothes then I decide what I want to eat for dinner." Than is used to compare things- "This is better than that." So, basically, then is used for chronological references and than is used for comparisons. Next, writers often misuse break and brake. While I'm working, I take breaks. The car's brakes are going out. Another common misuse is neither/nor and either/or. If you were given the choice between two things and you wanted to let the reader know that no matter what was chosen, nothing would work, you would use neither/nor. I've read sentences that say, "Either Chuck or Rick would not make a good teacher." That is incorrect. The proper way to word that sentence is, "Neither Chuck nor Rick would be a good teacher." The next misused word I'm going to mention is mainly a pet-peeve of mine- nauseous vs. nauseated.  Other things give off smells that are nauseous, making someone nauseated. If you write, "I started feeling nauseous," you are saying, "I started felling like I was giving off an offending smell." If you were to write, "I started feeling nauseated," you would mean, "I started to have a queasy feeling in my stomach." 

 

Finally, the most common editing issue I come across is poorly structured sentences that do not flow well. They can be anything from a fragmented sentence like, "I noticed everything in the room. The grand chandeliers hanging from the ceiling. The tables lined with white linen table cloths. The green balls." In this example, "The green balls," is a fragmented sentence. What were the green balls doing? They can also be run-on sentences that should have some sort of punctuation but don't so the sentence just keeps going and overloads the readers with constant information instead of helping the reader understand what is going on in the story. I believe that last sentence is a great example of a run-on sentence. Lastly, poorly structured sentences are ones that a reader has to go back and reread to try and make sense of what the author is really trying to say. I cannot think of a good example right now. 

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


Prompt 624 – Challenge
Tag – Point of View
Right about your day from the point of view of your pet. If you don’t have a pet do it from the point of view of a spider that has built its web in your home.

Prompt 625 – Word List
Tag - Word List
Use the following words in a story – Maple tree, winding road, storm clouds, a green jacket, a ball.


Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 622 – Creative

Tag – First line

“Are we almost home?”

 

Prompt 623 – Creative

Tag – The Adult

The government has become concerned with its overwhelming elderly population. To keep so many from being left living alone, they are now doing a lottery for new places, whether it is a single person, a couple, or a family for housing, but you are matched with a person 65 or above who has no family. You find out you just got chosen. What is your new roommate like?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 620 – Creative

Tag – List of Words

Use the following words in a story – tablet, phone, a sandwich, a pen, and an ambulance

 

Prompt 621 – Challenge

Tag – Country Western

Authors can get stuck writing in the same style. Your challenge is to fit within this theme. Focus on the setting and having your characters come to life.

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 618 – Creative

Tag – The Announcement

Your whole family has been gathered together for the first time in years. You think nothing of it, until you hear your cousin’s discussing some sort of announcement and find out this is all about you. What is the announcement

 

Prompt 619 – Creative

Tag – First Line

“I can’t believe I’m doing this.”

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 616 – Creative

Tag – First Line

“I would love to do that with someone I loved.”

 

Prompt 617 – Creative

Tag -List of words

Use the following words in a story -  a postcard, nail clipper, hospital bed, Broadway tickets, a rash.

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 614 – Creative

Tag – The Changeling

You’ve been asked to come see your best friend’s new born child. Arriving you feel a chill as you enter their home, but put it out of your mind. As you hold the child, your ring comes in contact with the green eyed, raven headed child who suddenly screams. As you watch, his hair becomes golden blonde, with very fine features, and kaleidoscope eyes. Before either parent can say a word, you say, “Changeling!” What happens?

 

Prompt 615 – Creative

Tag – Mystery

The statue in the center of town has always been known to give a clue to a large fortune left by the founder of the town. Every year hundreds of people try to figure out the clues on the base o the statue but no one has ever found the treasure. What is the clue to the mystery?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 612 – Creative

Tag – The Costume

You’ve been invited to a costume party and your partner has sated they will take care of your costume too. On the night of the party you are mortified by the costume, but have no time for anything else. What is your costume?

 

Prompt 613 – Creative

Tag – List of words

Use the following words in a story – a sweater, an apple, a dead tree, a flat tire, a turkey.

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 610 – Creative

Tag – Broken Confidences

For years, you’ve been the one to keep everyone’s secrets and confidences. Now, the one man you’ve always desired comes to you admitting he has been cheated on by your best friend. You know about it, but are trying not take sides. As this hunk cries on your shoulder, do you follow your own desires or keep your secrets?

 

Prompt 611 – Creative

Tag – First Line

“Do you think we can do it again?’

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 608 – Challenge

Tag – Description

Pick an item to your right. Describe it in as much detail as you can. Try to use as many details as you can. You may not name the item.

 

Prompt 609 – Creative

Tag – List of words

Use the following words in a story – lunch bag, notebook, pink hat, broken belt, and a spider.

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 606 – Creative

Tag – The Class

Your job has decided that everyone needs to keep up with the rapidly changing workplace. Everyone has been signed up for various classes at the local university, completely paid for. When you arrive for the class it only has ten students all super attractive and smart, When the professor walks in your stunned silent. What is the class like?

 

Prompt 607 – Creative

Tag – First Line

“How much longer do we have?”

 



 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below. 

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 604 – Creative

Tag – List of words
Use the following words in a story – a coach, a white stallion, a gold ring, a cat, and a pickle.

 

Prompt 605 – Creative
Tag – The Change
Pat laughed as Barbara complained about her boyfriend and her period being late. Barbara was just a normal girl, unlike Pat. Pat was one of a growing number of people afflicted with the change. Every seven days their body completely morphed into the opposite sex. Both sexes lived independently of each other, and could even be gay and straight, bisexual, or even transgendered. What is Pat like?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 602 – Creative
Tag – First Line
Just tell which room is his, now!

 

Prompt 603 – Creative
Tag – Promises
As a child you had promised a creature your friendship and protection if it would fetch the ring you had accidentally dropped down the well. The creature retrieved the ring, you took it and quickly shoved it back into your father’s jewelry box. Now an adult, the creature has unexpectedly showed up demanding you keep your promise. What do you do?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Every once in a while, we like to providing some writing tips to both new and seasoned authors. One thing I've learned as an author is that we never stop learning. Today, Graeme has written up a writing tip for you on the use of speech tags in your writing. Enjoy!

 

Speech Tags

Graeme

 

Speech tags are important to stories, but they can be easily misused and abused.

 

What do I mean by speech tags? Speech tags are the little bit of narration that proceeds or follows dialogue and is explicitly linked to dialogue. They're used to indicate whose dialogue is being reported. The simplest and most common example is the word "said".

Quote

"We're off to the lake," Michael said.

 

So what is there to talk about with speech tags? The answer is plenty. The first comment is simple:

 

1. Speech tags should be avoided as much as possible.

 

Why? Because not only can they clutter up a story if overused, but often they are unnecessary, and alternatives can actually make the story stronger. For example,

Quote

Michael tapped me on the shoulder. "We're off to the lake."

It's more verbose, but it's clear that Michael is the one speaking because of the narrated action, and so stating who spoke isn't necessary. Including the action also tells the reader more about what's going on because the speech isn't happening in isolation of any other activity. When possible, use that activity to not only inform the reader of what is happened, but who is speaking. By combining descriptive narration with dialogue, it's often possible to eliminate speech tags.

 

Of course, the flip side is that you don't want to overload your story with description when it's the dialogue that's important, so using speech tags to identify the speaker is fine in those situations. This, however, brings us to the next comment:

 

2. Keep speech tags simple.

 

What do I mean by this? I'll demonstrate with an over the top example:

Quote

"We're off to the lake," Michael exclaimed.


"Sorry, I can't come," I apologized.

"That's too bad," Michael sighed.

"How about next week?" I proposed.

"Maybe. I have other plans," Michael grimaced.

"You always have other plans," I laughed.

"Some of us aren't social outcasts," Michael grunted.

 

Yes, that's extreme, but all those different speech tags distract from what's being said. What's happening here is the author (okay, me) is trying to tell the user what's happening through the use of speech tags. This is almost always not needed, or even possibly inappropriate.

 

In the above example, the "I apologized" and "I proposed" are not needed. All the readers will recognize the words spoken as being an apology (in the first case) or a proposal (in the second case) and they don't need to be told again through a speech tag. These lines could be left as simple dialogue, unattributed, if it's already been established that there are only two people present. If something is needed to indicate who is the second person in the conversation, narration can be used to indicate the speaker, as per the technique shown earlier:

Quote

I grimaced. "Sorry, I can't come."

 

The "Michael sighed" speech tag is borderline as to whether it's useful, though I personally would recommend using something to indicate his disappointment. However, a speech tag is unnecessary for this purpose. The words make it clear that he's unhappy, so a simple piece of descriptive narration is all that's needed.

Quote

"That's too bad." Michael sighed.

Changing the comma to a period is all that's necessary to allow the reader to come to the same conclusion, but the sighing is now an action, not speech. As an aside, while it's possible to sigh speech, it's only appropriate if the speech is short. As an exercise, try sighing the this paragraph. I suspect you'll find it's impossible. You can sigh a handful of words, but not long sentences.

 

The above also contains three examples of where speech tags have been used inappropriately:

Quote

"Maybe. I have other plans," Michael grimaced.


"You always have other plans," I laughed.

"Some of us aren't social outcasts," Michael grunted.

 

The first line has Michael grimacing dialogue, the second has the narrator laughing dialogue, and the third has Michael grunting dialogue. Now, I don't know about you, but I can't grimace, laugh or grunt statements (though I can come close on the last one if it's a single word). Grimacing and laughing are things you do alongside dialogue. I can speak while laughing, but I can't laugh a sentence. Laughing is not speech, it's an activity. Speaking happens before, after, or in parallel with that activity. Similarly for grimacing.

 

Speech tags such as grunted, hissed, and growled, can sometimes be okay, but you should be careful. For example, you can't hiss something unless it contains sibilants. Growled implies a deeper tone which isn't always appropriate for the words being used. Overall, it's better to use a different option to portray what you want, rather than a speech tag. In the above example, the last line is better as:

Quote

Michael grunted. "Some of us aren't social outcasts."

Though even that isn't that great. Personally, rather than a grunt, I'd have Michael roll his eyes, shrug, or maybe even smirk, either before, during, or after the dialogue, depending on what emotion I'm looking at portraying.

 

Overall, it's better to keep to a handful of speech tags: 'said', 'asked', and maybe 'replied'. Other speech tags should be used sparingly, and even the simple speech tags should be used with care. If they're not needed, don't use them. In the above example, the opening statement was exclaimed. What other ways can you use to show someone exclaimed something? The answer is via a descriptive narration:

Quote

"We're off to the lake." Michael was almost bouncing with excitement.

 

My final comment is on the speech tag companion: adverbs.

 

3. Keep adverb use to a minimum.


Adverbs are often used to strengthen speech tags, but it's often better to replace them with description narration:

Quote

"Do you want to come to the beach with me?" Michael asked hopefully.

This is a good example of where description could be used instead of the speech tag and adverb.

Quote

"Do you want to come to the beach with me?" Michael raised an eyebrow as a hopeful half-smile played on his lips.

 

Sometimes, rather than trying to use an adverb to show the tone or volume, showing the response is stronger:

Quote

"Do you really want little old me to go with you while you try to pick up boys?" I asked sarcastically.

becomes

Quote

"Do you really want little old me to go with you while you try to pick up boys?"


Michael winced at the heavy sarcasm. He knows how I feel when he flirts with others guys.

This avoids the adverb while also doing character development by informing the reader of something about both Michael and the narrator. Yes, it's more verbose, but it also reads better. Alternatives could be:

Quote

I sneered at Michael. "Do you really want little old me to go with you while you try to pick up boys?"

That's not quite as strong, but it still gives the sarcastic feel to the dialogue without the use of an adverb. Remember, most adverbs are a shorthand for an observable action/reaction. As such, it's often better to show that observation and let the reader interpret it themselves, rather than spoon-feeding them with how they should interpret the dialogue.

 

Even better than using narration would be change the dialogue to make the spoken words provide that information without support, though that can be a challenge at times. Beginning authors often use adverbs as a crutch to support weak dialogue. As an exercise, each time you've used an adverb, try to work out if you can change the words to make the adverb unnecessary:

Quote

"I wish he was here," Greg said sadly.

could be re-written as

Quote

"I wish he was here," Greg said. "I miss him so much."

 

That last example also shows how you can use a speech tag to indicate a slight pause. The two statements are separated by the speech tag, and the reader will naturally view that as a pause between the two sentences. It's stronger than putting the speech tag at the end:

Quote

"I wish he was here. I miss him so much," Greg said.

 

Having said all of that, there are times when adverbs are very useful. In particular, when you want a contradiction between the words spoken and the tone used. For example:

Quote

"I love him," Joe said bitterly.

You can certainly write this to avoid the adverb, but it's simple and gives the reader the impression you want. This is not a common situation, but when it occurs an adverb is definitely a viable option.

 

 

So, in summary, use speech tags carefully. Don't over use them, and try not to get too fancy. Try to avoid using speech tags and adverbs to support weak dialogue. Make the dialogue stronger so it carries the emphasis you want without support, or try using description narrative to support the dialogue. Both are both better options most of the time.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 600 – Creative
Tag – List of words
Use the following words in a story – a bloody hand print, a bullet casing, a pink hair ribbon, a pizza, and a diamond cufflink.

 

Prompt 601 -Creative
Tag – Stone life
There was an asteroid that struck the ocean with such force, tidal waves struck from the tip of Brazil to Alaska, from Russia to New Zealand, and Antarctica.  The next day hundreds of volcanoes woke and began to spew lava. Then large rock figures began walking the earth, coming from the volcanoes. What are these stone figures and what do they want?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection.

 


 

Prompt 598 – Creative
Tag – The picnic
Your significant other always tries to do something nice, but it always goes astray. This time they plan a picnic. What happens?

 

Prompt  599 – Creative
Tag – The Mummy
You are the last one to believe in hokey things like vampires, werewolves, or monsters. Mummies you know are real because your mother is an archeologist who has just found an ancient tomb in Peru. You were with her when they brought the sarcophagus out. That night you dream of the mummy, and the next morning the mummy is missing. What happens next?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone is having a good week so far. If you're looking to write, then why not try out one of these writing prompts.

 


 

Prompt 596 – Creative

Tag – The Gift
As the leader of your people you have been told you are being sent a gift by the new species your race has encountered in space. All your top scientists have been able to decode is the gift is very precious and a symbol of how they wish to coexist. A large box is delivered to your ship. When opened you find a youth in suspended animation. What do you do with your gift?

 

Prompt 597 – Creative
Tag – First Line
How does he always know what to say?

 


 

Did you write a prompt response last week? Don't forget to share it below.

Cia

Who's been hankering for a reason to write? Are you blocked on your current stories? Just want to play around with something different? Well, then the prompts (brought to you by prompt guru, Comicfan!) are a great way to do just that! Oh, and if you're interested in getting a short piece featured in the site newsletter, check out the Household Items game. There's still time to play!

 


Prompt 594 – Creative
Tag – Western
Write a story with a western theme. Cowboys, horses, and whatever you need to make it come alive.

 

Prompt 595 – Creative
Tag – List of Words
Write a story using the following story – superhero, a mouse, a wallet, an overstuffed pillow, and a boot.

 


 

So did you write a flash fiction piece this week? Share it in the comments below!

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far and is looking forward to the weekend. What better way to start it off than with brand new prompts! If you've been feeling stuck, or maybe just want to do something a little different, maybe one of these prompts will jump start a new idea. Just remember, prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection. Also, to make it so that nobody feels like their prompt response is getting overlooked, we've changed the format. Rather than us picking the prompt responses to share, authors can share their response in the comments. Provide a small excerpt and a link and help people find your prompts!

 


 

Prompt 592 -  Challenge

Tag – Details
Describe your favorite object. Try to use as many senses as you can in your description, making the details come alive for your reader.

 

Prompt 593 – Creative
Tag – First Line
What did you promise this time?

 


 

So, did you write a prompt response last week? Share it with us!

Renee Stevens

Hope everyone has had a great week so far. It's time for this weeks writing prompts. If you're stuck, or you're considering writing for the first time, these might be perfect for you. Don't forget that stories under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection. For the featured prompt responses, we're going to start doing things a little different. Rather than me pick a prompt from the previous week, the authors themselves can share their prompts in the comments. This way, no one gets left out!

 


 

Prompt 590 – Creative

Tag – Heart Failure
You weren’t feeling good, so on your lunch break you figured you would go to the local walk-in clinic. As you enter you collapse. The only thing you remember upon waking is these two dark brown eyes. You are told by a co-worker who stops by that you were saved by a cute doctor who was on his way out of the clinic as you collapsed. What happened next?

 

Prompt 591 – Creative
Tag – List of Words
Use the following words in a story – a blanket, a broken cell phone, a park, a squirrel, and a pear.

 


 

Now, share your prompt responses from Prompt #588 and Prompt #589!

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection. Hopefully you'll find something in this weeks prompts to spark an idea and get you writing!

 


 

Prompt 588 – Creative

Tag – The Pitch
You were hired to write a new television show. You were asked to create something unique. What is your pitch?

 

Prompt 589 – Creative

Tag – First Line
Who is singing that?

 


 

Our three responses to Prompt #586:

 


 

BHopper2 - Prompt #586

 

“Where are you planning to get the money for that vacation?” Professor Kline asked looking over at AJ. “Three weeks touring Ireland, England, and Scotland, seems to be rather expensive.”

 

AJ smiled at his Professor, knowing he meant well. Professor Kline was his academic advisor, and whom he sought guidance on a variety of issues over the years. He’s also the man, which needed to approve him to access the campus computer system while he was away. “It’s mine and Tommy’s wedding honeymoon. Dad’s bankrolling it. Though, we have to take our own spending cash. I’ve already talked to my grandparents, and I can pull the money out from my Trust. It’s going to be a magical trip.” AJ stated with a twinkle in his eye.

 

“Alright, thanks for answering, though you didn’t need too. Are you going to have the time to study while over there? Don’t get me wrong, schoolwork would be the last thing I thought of, while I was with my new partner while on a honeymoon.”

 



JohnAR - MetaDeprivation

 

“Where are you planning to get the money for that vacation?” the mailbox message said. Colt closed his phone before it had finished, checked the time, 30 more minutes, before putting it away. It seemed his mother during one of her not so bright moments, had called him and left that message, instead of on his father’s phone. He didn’t even get excited about the notion of ‘vacation.’ They would never go for a vacation. And even if, he didn’t want to go on vacation. Not with people he didn’t love. So no vacation. Ever.

 

He only felt guilty for two seconds, he was supposed to love his parents, but he didn’t feel it. No surprise, the freak he was. No surprise, the loner he was.

 

“You will never belong,” the stranger said, reading his thoughts.

 


 

Comicfan - A Prompt A Week

 

“Where are you planning to get the money for that vacation?” Tony looked over Mark’s broad shoulder at the website on screen.

 

“I can look. You know I’ve been putting money away.” Tony turned and glared at his brother. “And it isn’t a vacation, it’s called a honeymoon!”

 

“Yeah, yeah.” Tony smiled and sat on his older brother’s bed. “Just don’t you and Bran forget to bring me back something!”

 

“You do realize its our honeymoon. We aren’t going for souvenirs, you know?”

Cia

Sorry this is late. Totally spaced it being a Friday and that I needed to check and see if the prompts were posted. Whoops! These prompts were supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection. Hopefully you'll find something in this weeks prompts to spark an idea and get you writing!

 


Prompt 586 – Creative

Tag – First Line

Where are you planning to get the money for that vacation?

 

Prompt 587 – Creative

Tag – List of Words

Use the following words in a story - a kilt, a coat rack, a video game, a flower, and a cat


 

Jason Rimbaud - Prompt 584 Creative "List of Words"

I gave myself five minutes to use the following words in this weeks prompt.

 

Use these words; lunch box, wooden table, a white horse, menu, and a needle.

 

I put my lunch box on the wooden picnic table and stared at the days lunch menu all the other kids were enjoying at Rex Harrison Middle School.  It wasn’t that we were poor, it was just normal in my family that I wear my older brothers clothes after he outgrew them.  That’s why I was adept with needle and thread. Everyone around me was laughing and joking with friends.  For once the entire class was ignoring me.  I pushed the menu away and opened my lunch box and removed my cheese sandwich.  As I absently bite into the stale bread, I opened my notebook and looked at the doodle that happened in last period.  I don’t care what the teacher thinks, it was a white horse, not a zebra.

Renee Stevens

I hope everyone is having a great week! It's time for this weeks prompts, supplied by our prompt guru, Comicfan. Just a reminder, and for those who haven't worked with the prompts before: prompt responses under 1,000 words must be posted as part of a collection. Hopefully you'll find something in this weeks prompts to spark an idea and get you writing!

 


 

Prompt 584 – Creative

Tag – List of Words

Use the following words in a story – lunch box, wooden table, a white horse, menu, and a needle.

 

Prompt 585 – Creative

Tag – The Lady

You were hired at a new company and every one has been really nice. After your first week, your boss informs you that you have been assigned to the new president of the company to be part of her start up project. When you ask about her or the job you are told she is a lady and you will find out. What is the lady like?

 



BHopper2 - Prompt: 583 – Creative "Matchmaker"

 

Caleb walked into the office and looked around at the bright cheerful décor. He was still fuming from where his Mother had set him up with a Matchmaker. However, he wanted to make her happy, so he decided to humor her. His first visit with the Matchmaker, Linda Styles, was at his condo off of Bayshore Blvd., three weeks ago. They sat on the balcony sipping coffee while looking out over Tampa Bay, and Downtown Tampa. She had him fill out the forms, and answer questions on what he was attracted to, and other personality base ones. “Thank you, and you’ll hear from me soon,” was the last thing he had heard from Linda, as she left. Until last night.

 

“Caleb, it's Linda, I’ve found you a match! Come by my office tomorrow, and you’ll meet him,” she said in her voicemail. Caleb had missed her call while he was out running.

 

Now Caleb was in her office, and after checking in, sat in the lobby as he waited to be called back.

 

“First time here?” a man sitting in the lobby asked him.

 

“It is,” Caleb replied to him, “you’ve been here before?”

 

 

Renee Stevens

Sorry y'all for the prompts being late. My days are all messed up and I completely spaced that today was Friday. Don't forget to share your prompt responses in the forum and if it's under 1,000 words, it must be posted as part of a collection. Now, let's see what comicfan has for us today.

 


 

Prompt 582 – Creative

Tag – First Line

How can I tell him about the accident, when I can’t even keep it together?

 

Prompt 583 – Creative

Tag – Lonely Hearts

Your mother is tired of seeing you alone and she wants grandchildren. Without your knowledge she hires a matchmaker. What is your match like?

 


 

Since there were no takers on last week's prompts, how about everyone share a random prompt response with us? Pull up your prompt responses, close your eyes, and point. Whichever prompt response you point to, that's the one you share with us!

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