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  1. What's new in this club
  2. Take a bite... https://www.gayauthors.org/story/asamvav111/euphoria-and-other-poems/13
  3. This is a very intriguing Sonnet. And you are right: the opening line is simple, direct and beautiful. The contrast between the seasons via two insects who usually do not get much facetime in poetry is wonderful. This is an A+ Romantic-era poem in my opinion. Thanks for posting it to inspire us!
  4. Hi everyone! I’ve only recently joined the site, but it’s felt so warm and welcoming that I thought it’d be interesting to share something for discussion. I write poetry in both English and Spanish and only recently have begun to blend both my languages within poems. I was having in interesting exchange with a professor at my university this year where I confessed that sometimes I felt pressured to offer translated versions of my writing, while sacrificing the value of what a Spanish word or phrase was adding to my poem in order to please non-Spanish speaking readers. I mentioned I had begun blending the two languages without offering translations and he said I shouldn’t feel obliged to offer translations. He said readers shouldn’t force a type of language or culture censorship where the value of a piece is diminished because they can’t simply put the effort to translate words and phrases themselves or research the context of a piece. I’m curious if anyone else has thought about this dilemma of culture and language in your poetry and whether you share the professors opinion or have something else regarding it. It’ll be lovely to discuss!
  5. We always talk about prose needing a good strong opening. Well poems can benefit from the same. Here is one that grabs you by the shirt collar. It makes you pay attention. Enjoy.. On the Grasshopper and Cricket By John Keats The Poetry of earth is never dead: When all the birds are faint with the hot sun, And hide in cooling trees, a voice will run From hedge to hedge about the new-mown mead; That is the Grasshopper’s—he takes the lead In summer luxury,—he has never done With his delights; for when tired out with fun He rests at ease beneath some pleasant weed. The poetry of earth is ceasing never: On a lone winter evening, when the frost Has wrought a silence, from the stove there shrills The Cricket’s song, in warmth increasing ever, And seems to one in drowsiness half lost, The Grasshopper’s among some grassy hills.
  6. I have broken my poetical drought with two attempts at an ode in Sapphic style. Attempt being the correct word ... To be found here: https://www.gayauthors.org/story/northie/re-verse/5
  7. Parker Owens

    Poems in different languages

    I agree - the poetry is undying. It is such a beautiful translation. Evocative and engaging of the senses.
  8. Mikiesboy

    Poems in different languages

    Hi immortal poet...love this one
  9. AC Benus

    Poems in different languages

    One of my joys in life (yes, poet here ) is translating the Tanka from the anthology known as the Hyakunin Isshu (or, The Issue of a Hundred People). Here is No. 32 by Harumichi no Tsuraki; it's an autumn poem. In a mountain stream The wind-shaken remnants fall, Like crimson rain spots Turning the water opaque Amidst swirls of maple leaves. (my book says the poet passed away in the year 864, but poetry is immortal!)
  10. https://www.gayauthors.org/story/ac-benus/pride-month-and-other-haibun/4 it's a great piece.. just wonderful in fact... the poem and the haibun...
  11. Oh, the cityscape! You frequent And swift flash of eyes Offering me love, Offering me the response Of my own – these repay me. Lovers unending Only repay me. Yet comes one, a city boy, And when we must part, Kisses me lightly, Yet still full of robust love. And I in pub or crosswalk, Kiss him in return. American men, We are those two natural, And fine nonchalant persons. Walt Whitman https://www.gayauthors.org/story/ac-benus/pride-month-and-other-haibun/4
  12. Aaron Hostetter's translation continues several lines further on with the tree speaking: “There I dared not go beyond the Lord’s word to bow or burst apart—then I saw the corners of the earth tremor—I could have felled all those foemen, nevertheless I stood fast. (35-38) “The young warrior stripped himself then—that was God Almighty— strong and firm of purpose—he climbed up onto the high gallows, magnificent in the sight of many. Then he wished to redeem mankind. I quaked when the warrior embraced me— yet I dared not bow to the ground, collapse to earthly regions, but I had to stand there firm. The rood was reared. I heaved the mighty king, the Lord of Heaven—I dared not topple or reel. (39-45) “They skewered me with dark nails, wounds easily seen upon me, treacherous strokes yawning open. I dared injure none of them. They shamed us both together. I was besplattered with blood, sluicing out from the man’s side, after launching forth his soul. (46-49) --- You can check out these pages for more information and the entire text. http://whatinmind.blogspot.com/2009/06/dream-of-rood.html https://anglosaxonpoetry.camden.rutgers.edu/dream-of-the-rood/ this is something i've often heard about but dont really know.. thanks for posting these excerpts and the links, AC xo
  13. Several weeks ago I watched a program about the meaning and origins of Beowulf. Michael Wood has organized and hosted any number of fascinating shows, and this time another poem seemed to stand out for me. Called The Dream of the Rood (or Dream of the Cross), it's timeless in a way, and views the world from a tree's perspective. Here is Wood's translation of the opening of the poem: Listen! I will tell the best of dreams, which I had at mid-night, When all the world sleeps. I dreamt I saw a wondrous tree towering in the sky above me, suffused with light, the brightest of beams. Aaron Hostetter's translation continues several lines further on with the tree speaking: “There I dared not go beyond the Lord’s word to bow or burst apart—then I saw the corners of the earth tremor—I could have felled all those foemen, nevertheless I stood fast. (35-38) “The young warrior stripped himself then—that was God Almighty— strong and firm of purpose—he climbed up onto the high gallows, magnificent in the sight of many. Then he wished to redeem mankind. I quaked when the warrior embraced me— yet I dared not bow to the ground, collapse to earthly regions, but I had to stand there firm. The rood was reared. I heaved the mighty king, the Lord of Heaven—I dared not topple or reel. (39-45) “They skewered me with dark nails, wounds easily seen upon me, treacherous strokes yawning open. I dared injure none of them. They shamed us both together. I was besplattered with blood, sluicing out from the man’s side, after launching forth his soul. (46-49) --- You can check out these pages for more information and the entire text. http://whatinmind.blogspot.com/2009/06/dream-of-rood.html https://anglosaxonpoetry.camden.rutgers.edu/dream-of-the-rood/
  14. A touching poem by @Renee Stevens on her impending motherhood. https://www.gayauthors.org/story/renee-stevens/poetrybyrenee/12
  15. I laughed until my breath was scant, at poems of the lowly ant, who scandalized a mighty queen as well as her dull sycophant. ...there must be more... thank you for this!
  16. That was funny...and not to worry, i used the litter box. I saw some ant traps though....vas ist das? Lol
  17. Oh! That was priceless! AC I hope you bring us more prams soon! Ha!
  18. *sniffs a couple times* ...What's that smell...? Oh, yes! It must be Monty Python and Poetry. Enjoy, but do watch the carpet; there's a good little chappie
  19. Yeah, it's an old geisha song, or a couple of them that I combined.
  20. that's lovely AC ... i just found the thing about cats choosing who to love is just odd... cats do it anywhere.. tom cats. i'd like to know what you were writing about....if its about another country, do they think of cats differently? i love the poem though.. i'm just curious
  21. Thank you, Parker. You're very kind
  22. You have spoken with truth and depth in this. I felt the chill of autumn wind, and the white heat of summer, too, each season driving us, like cats, to our appointed purposes.
  23. Yesterday I sent Lyssa a stage piece I wrote a few years ago, and re-discovered how interesting the poetry is in it. The numbers are based on songs of the geisha from the 17th to the 19th century. Many of them are based on themes of longing. Here is the second number from the work. I hope you enjoy it ------------------- Beyond the chide to duty, Below the scowl of people – The judging looks, The opinioned nods, The tabby cat, and one white, Sidle the ridge of the roof – The knowing looks, The fore-tasting wants, Stronger than the fear of death Is the calming need for love. Above the call of duty, Before the scheme of people – An autumn wind Will soon come to them And that passionate embrace, That driving need to make love – Is set aside, Will be forgotten. How I envy just the way Cats pick who and where to love. _
  24. https://www.gayauthors.org/story/mikiesboy/tims-bits-and-pieces/4 In case you missed it .... a Haibun, by tim. Concrete and Fantasy
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