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Ronyx

June is LGBT Pride Month- How will you celebrate?

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14 minutes ago, TetRefine said:

 

People in my generation (20s and younger) often get accused of this, but it isn’t true. We may show it in different ways then generations past but to say we “don’t seem to have even the tiniest idea” is nonsense. But the way of celebrating Pride has shifted, like everything else, with the times and circumstances. It’s a sign of progress and be happy for that reason. 😏

 

I certainly didn’t mean to imply it’s a generational thing - it’s just how I find people around here, no matter how old they are.  There definitely are people who do have a sense of what it’s about, but they seem to be in a minority.  If your experience is different, in that people generally ‘get it’, then that’s a great thing.  I don’t begrudge anyone being able to celebrate, there truly is, for a lot of people, a lot worth celebrating.  And there’s also still huge progress needed in many, many areas, both politically and geographically.

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12 minutes ago, Sam Wyer said:

 

I certainly didn’t mean to imply it’s a generational thing - it’s just how I find people around here, no matter how old they are.  There definitely are people who do have a sense of what it’s about, but they seem to be in a minority.  If your experience is different, in that people generally ‘get it’, then that’s a great thing.  I don’t begrudge anyone being able to celebrate, there truly is, for a lot of people, a lot worth celebrating.  And there’s also still huge progress needed in many, many areas, both politically and geographically.

 

This we can absolutely agree on. 👍🏻

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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, Sam Wyer said:

I'll be celebrating subtly - like how I do most things :)  Maybe I'll change my watch strap for a rainbow one 🌈  I guess i like the idea that being persistently visible is more important that one weekend of partying.  And around here (UK) most people going to Pride events don't seem to have even the tiniest idea why such things happen, or what it is that they are 'celebrating'.

I see quite a few movies produced by BBC and the UK’s Channel 4 that explore the history of the LGBTQ community. There were more than a few the were produced to commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the legalization of Gay sex in the UK that I saw last year a Frameline. The information is out there if anyone wants to view it.

 

2 hours ago, TetRefine said:

People in my generation (20s and younger) often get accused of this, but it isn’t true. We may show it in different ways then generations past but to say we “don’t seem to have even the tiniest idea” is nonsense. But the way of celebrating Pride has shifted, like everything else, with the times and circumstances. It’s a sign of progress and be happy for that reason. 😏

I’m sorry, but many who are similar in age to you who are unaware of significant events in LGBTQ history. But I wouldn’t take that too personally if I were you. Jimmy Kimmel Live regularly runs games that pit youngsters against elderly people. It’s amazing how little some people know – and amazing how much others know! JKL’s games are about pop culture with questions about TV shows, movies, and music.

 

 

When reading some stories, it becomes clear that the author is unfamiliar with LGBTQ history (irrespective of the author’s age). I remember reading a story about a Gay diver who made it to the ’68 Mexico City Olympic Games. (This was the one where John Carlos and Tommie Smith, two African-American runners, were banned from the Games and were stripped of their medals for giving the Black Power Salute. The third man on the winner’s platform, an Australian, wore a pin in support – he also was punished for his participation and was not featured at the Sydney Games like most other prominent Aussie athletes.) The protagonist meets the runners who gave the Black Power Salute, but even though the protagonist was supposedly Gay, he never met Dr Tom Waddell!

 

When I asked the author about the discrepancy, he admitted he hadn’t been aware of Tom Waddell until I mentioned him in my email! Certainly in a huge event like the Olympics, it’s very possible for two athletes from different events to never meet, but that wasn’t the reason in this case. A little research into the Mexico City Olympics could have uncovered Tom Waddell and his significance to LGBTQ history. Tom and a few others organized what they called the Gay Olympics, similar to many other groups. But the USOC (United States Olympic Committee) took exception to the use and sued Tom Waddell. Normally something like this is settled out of court with a token fine and an agreement to change the event’s name. The USOC decided to really punish Tom by pursuing the claim in court even while Tom was dying of AIDS. The USOC won the US Supreme Court decision five years after the first Gay Games occurred. Tom died later that year.

 

[sarcasm] All because they ‘own’ the rights to the word ‘Olympic’ (through Congressional mandate) and needed to protect the image of their Games from the disgusting and perverted Gays. [/sarcasm]

 

In all fairness, maybe young people just don’t know California history…  ;–)

Edited by droughtquake
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At our Pride event this year, I saw more young people than ever before. Couples in their teens and early 20's were holding hands or in an embrace. Most were proudly wearing Pride attire. They get it- they understand the significance of what Pride is all about. Also to my surprise, I saw numerous straight families this year with their young children wearing rainbow shirts, hats and wristbands. I also noticed that during a popular drag show performance on Friday night, many children were watching and applauding as they stood before the stage with their mothers and fathers. This is the Midwest, not NYC or SF. As Bob Dylan wrote, 'The Times They Are A-Changin.' We have more support than I think we sometimes realize.

 

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4 hours ago, Ronyx said:

At our Pride event this year, I saw more young people than ever before. Couples in their teens and early 20's were holding hands or in an embrace. Most were proudly wearing Pride attire. They get it- they understand the significance of what Pride is all about. Also to my surprise, I saw numerous straight families this year with their young children wearing rainbow shirts, hats and wristbands. I also noticed that during a popular drag show performance on Friday night, many children were watching and applauding as they stood before the stage with their mothers and fathers. This is the Midwest, not NYC or SF. As Bob Dylan wrote, 'The Times They Are A-Changin.' We have more support than I think we sometimes realize.

 

I might have mentioned this kid in an earlier post, but I thought it was worth bringing up again. His name is Desmond Napoles, more commonly known by his drag name "Desmond is Amazing". Very impressive resumé for a ten-year-old, I have to admit. Kids are understanding at an earlier age that it doesn't matter whether you're a boy or a girl, or something else in between, just so long as you stay true to yourself. :)

 

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Posted (edited)

A documentary called Growing Up Coy played at Frameline40 (2016). It was about a family with a child who is Trans. They fought their elementary school to force them to allow their child to use the appropriate restroom facilities. Dad is ex-military and they live in Colorado!

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Edited by droughtquake
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I’ll be seeing Man in an Orange Shirt tomorrow evening on the big screen, but you can see it on the small screen on PBS. KQED is showing it on Sunday evening. You can pretend you’re at the film festival with me too!  ;–)

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18 hours ago, droughtquake said:

BART has always been overwhelmed after the Pride Parade!  ;–)

 

CalTrain? I don’t want to visit my (biological) brothers in San José!  ;–)

 

I don’t really have a lot of choices for getting home in the East Bay. It’s Muni to BART to AC Transit (bus) or Muni to AC Transit (a very long bus ride). There are no other real options.  ;–)

 

That's true.  It's always overwhelmed, even if it's not Pride event.  (Warriors game can be pretty bad last few years)  But you do get to see more crazy dressed up people during Pride though.  LOL.  So I see you're in the East Bay.

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39 minutes ago, Ashi said:

That's true.  It's always overwhelmed, even if it's not Pride event.  (Warriors game can be pretty bad last few years)  But you do get to see more crazy dressed up people during Pride though.  LOL.  So I see you're in the East Bay.

When I used to go to the Parade (back in the ‘90s), the BART train used to be filled with LGBTQs staring with distrust at Jehovah’s Witnesses heading to the Cow Palace for their annual meetings. The JWs looked frightened by all the colorful clothes and personalities! Back when there used to be empty seats on the trains before the parade began!  ;–)

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