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jamessavik

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jamessavik last won the day on May 19 2015

jamessavik had the most liked content!

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8,773 Catch Me If You Can

About jamessavik

  • Rank
    Cat Bastard

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Sexuality
    Gay
  • Age
    50
  • Location
    Darkest Ignoramia
  • Interests
    astronomy, physics, math, programming, E-bay, red heads, my truck

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Recent Profile Visitors

80,617 profile views
  1. Make us laugh!

    Ewwww!
  2. Make us laugh!

    Important Holiday reminder- NOBODY REALLY LIKES FRUITCAKE!
  3. LolCats

    Fraggin nip dealers!
  4. Make us laugh!

    Look out for Satan Claus- you know he's out there!
  5. LolCats

    Hork the halls with loads of hairballs... fa la la la lalalala
  6. What Are You Reading Right Now? (Non-GA)

    Magician by RE Feist Book 1 of the The Riftwar Saga.
  7. I am an enlightened soul that seeks to understand. Unfortunately, I've come to understand that way too many people are dumb asses. :gikkle:

    1. wenmale64

      wenmale64

      And some are simply dumb while others are simply asses.......

  8. LolCats

  9. LolCats

    I think my cat needs rehab. He's dealing nip and hanging out with strays. He's always talking back and fighting. He stays out all night and comes home all bedraggled and smelly. Lot's of new kittens in the neighborhood look just like him. He's either spaced out or hyper. He has mood shifts between lethargic, irritable. He's always paranoid and hides when cops drive by. Anybody have any suggestions about my delinquent cat?
  10. There will be *Three* super moons between now and Jan 31- 12/3, 1/1 and 1/31 They often coincide with geological events like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. See more in the astronomy section of the Tech & Science geek forum.

    1. Page Scrawler

      Page Scrawler

      I knew that the moon causes the tides, but it can also affect tectonic activity? :huh:

    2. jamessavik

      jamessavik

      There seems to be a correlation between super-moons and earthquakes. The Haiti and Japanese quakes coincided with a supermoon and the Indian ocean tsunami was just after one.

    3. Timothy M.

      Timothy M.

      Interesting. The supermoon looks fantastic here.

  11. Astronomy

    NASA VIDEO: "Supermoon Trilogy!" --Tonight's Moon Kicks Off a Series of Three Supermoons on December 3, 2017, January 1, 2018, and January 31, 2018 (WATCH Video) December 03, 2017 Source Link: Daily Galaxy Mark your calendars: on December 3, 2017, January 1, 2018, and January 31, 2018. A supermoon is a Moon that is full when it is also at or near its closest point in its orbit around Earth. Since the Moon’s orbit is elliptical, one side (apogee) is about 30,000 miles (50,000 km) farther from Earth than the other (perigee). Nearby perigee full Moons appear about 14% bigger and 30% brighter than full Moons that occur near apogee in the Moon's orbit. “The supermoons are a great opportunity for people to start looking at the Moon, not just that once but every chance they have!” says Noah Petro, a research scientist from NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center. It’s hard for our eyes to distinguish these small changes in size when the Moon is high amidst the vastness of the night sky. But any time you catch a full Moon as it rises or sets, while it’s suspended low on the horizon beaming through the silhouettes of trees or buildings, its apparent size might make you do a double-take. You almost feel as though you could reach out, grab the glowing orb, and drop it into your coffee cup. Even more so if it’s a supermoon. If you can only catch one episode of the supermoon trilogy, catch the third one. It will be extra special. First of all, the January 31st supermoon will feature a total lunar eclipse, with totality viewable from western North America across the pacific to Eastern Asia. The Moon’s orbit around our planet is tilted so it usually falls above or below the shadow of the Earth. About twice each year, a full Moon lines up perfectly with the Earth and Sun such that Earth’s shadow totally blocks the Sun’s light, which would normally reflect off the Moon. “The lunar eclipse on January 31 will be visible during moonset. Folks in the Eastern United States, where the eclipse will be partial, will have to get up in the morning to see it,” notes Petro. “But it’s another great chance to watch the Moon.” The Moon will lose its brightness and take on an eerie, fainter-than-normal glow from the scant sunlight that makes its way through Earth’s atmosphere. Often cast in a reddish hue because of the way the atmosphere bends the light, totally eclipsed Moons are sometimes called ‘blood Moons.’ “We’re seeing all of the Earth’s sunrises and sunsets at that moment reflected from the surface of the Moon,” says Sarah Noble, a Program Scientist at NASA headquarters. The January 31st supermoon will also be the second full Moon of the month. Some people call the second full Moon in a month a Blue Moon, that makes it a super ‘blue Moon.’ Blue Moons happen every two and a half years, on average. With the total eclipse, it’ll be a royal spectacle indeed: a ‘super blue blood’ Moon. Sometimes the celestial rhythms sync up just right to wow us. Heed your calendar reminders. On the three dates marked, step out into the moonset or moonrise and look up for a trilogy of sky watching treats! The Daily Galaxy via Moon/NASA
  12. Earth Sciences

    Mount Agung on Bali Erupts! Mount Agung on Wikipedia London Express live coverage
  13. LolCats

    FOUND: Cat was on my porch this morning. Ate 3 big cans of tuna. Was muddy from the rain, so we gave him a bath. If you know of anyone who is missing a Tabby let me know
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