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Found 8 results

  1. Show, Don't Tell

    It's been said many times before. It's practically one of the first basics that every writer learns, that every mentor teaches, and that every critic jumps on. That is the idea of 'show, don't tell'. And yet, while many people may hear that, to some it's a bit unclear as to what that really means, or how to achieve that particular goal. Hopefully, this would give you a slightly better perspective on what appears to be a very simple task on the surface, but actually takes a little practice and finesse to pull off correctly. The first thing to pay attention to is the difference between showing and telling. The 'telling' part of the equation is simple...these are the details of who your characters are and what's going on during any particular scene. Telling is a vital part of writing, so even though people say 'don't tell', don't think of telling as being the enemy. Telling is describing what your character is wearing, the color of his hair, how clean or how messy his bedroom may be, or whether or not it's raining outside. These are all things that your readers are going to need to know if they want to fill out a complete picture in their minds. You can also use telling to describe a certain action. Use it to let your reader know that your character crossed his arms, or that he gave your protagonist a slightly goofy grin. Maybe he's shuffling a deck of cards while he's talking or sipping beer out of a plastic cup. These are all acts of 'telling' your audience what they need to know and giving them a clear vision of where they are and what's happening. Now 'showing' is a little bit different. Showing is the talent using the basic details and actions above to tell a much deeper story. Think of telling as getting the ingredients, spices, and garnishings together for a gourmet dinner...and showing as actually having the skill to use those ingredients to make your dish a masterpiece. Sometimes, this is where some people get a little shaky, and if you try to cut corners on this part of the process, you'll be missing some of the emotion and reader involvement that you need to make your story memorable. Let's say you have someone in your story who's a friend of the main protagonist...but he can be a real jerk sometimes. Now there's nothing wrong with describing him through narration or simply writing, "He's my friend, but he can be a real jerk sometimes." That's perfectly functional, but that's just you 'telling' your readers that he can be a jerk. How do they know that? What are you going to do to demonstrate that? Simple...you create situations in your story (Even if they're very small scenes) that actually show him being a friend and other scenes that show him being a jerk. Maybe you have a small scene where he stands up for his best bud against a bully, but in the next scene he runs up and smacks the books out of his hands because he think it'll be funny. Just a few actions like that will give your readers the information they need about the character, and you won't have to waste time 'telling' them that. Find ways to use your story to actually demonstrate what you want your readers to know. Instead of saying, "He was so beautiful!" try creating a scene where your character is just caught off guard and keeps looking back at him. Describe his eyes, his hair, his laugh. Create an infatuation that your readers can feel and take part in. Just saying 'he's beautiful' isn't going to be memorable or important later. But readers will definitely remember that scene and think back to all the times they've felt the same way. It builds a stronger connection to what's going on. This works for everything. Moments of heartbreak, sadness, anger, and joy. Your characters' actions and spoken dialogue should say more about them than just what you type out on the screen. Every time you're describing something that isn't just concrete details...ask yourself how you can prove to your readers that the statement you just made is true. If you call someone a tough guy, or say that they're really funny, or that they seemed really shy and uncomfortable...ask yourself if you can find a way to demonstrate that through their actions instead of just saying so. Someone who's shy might look down at the floor when he talks or blush when given a compliment. Someone who's sad might seem distant or might be heard sniffling softly in a corner all by themselves at a party. Don't be afraid for your characters to speak for themselves and show who they are without the extra help. I hope this helps a little bit and gives everyone something to think about while you're writing or editing your next story. A few well-written moments in your story will create memories that your readers will cling to and remember. Unless you've just written one of the greatest, most quotable, sentences in the history of literature...no amount of simple words and details will have the same effect. Then again, if you can do BOTH...then go for it!
  2. Welcome to the New Year! We are wrapping up the last of the Writing Tips before launching our new weekly article feature. Be sure to check these out and let Comicality know what you think!
  3. This week, we start posting articles by Comicality. These are in our Writing Tips category in the story system. When we catch up on all those tips, we'll start posting new ones directly right in this blog. Keep an eye out! In the meantime, check out these tips by our very own Comicality:
  4. Week 3 of our Writing Tips Article Review is upon us. This week, we have an article from Don H and sat8997.
  5. Welcome to Week 2! As we continue to highlight previously posted Writing Tips, we'll bring you something old and something new.
  6. Welcome, everyone! Starting early in 2018, we will be posting weekly articles by Comicality and other authors every Saturday morning. I wanted to get this kicked off so between now and then we'll be posting links to previous Writing Tips, which can currently be found in our Stories Archive in the Non-Fiction -> Writing Tips category. Please be sure to check them out. Read and review! The three for this week are from Lugh:
  7. How do I make my story the best it can be? Before posting, make sure your story has the best editing possible. A good story becomes great when it's well-written. Make use of the Writing & Editing Corner forums. Know how to space and punctuate dialogue, craft characters who could step off the page, know point-of-view and how to use it.... Make use of all the story meta data fields. Write a description that sells the story, not just describes it, to make people want to read it. Use all the tags. Make sure you follow the posting guidelines in regards to the formatting to make sure you post it correctly so everyone can read it.
  8. Happy Wednesday everyone! I hope everyone is having a great week so far. I was looking through the possible posts that I had for today and I decided that it's been a while since we had a grammar lesson. Wouldn't you know it, I actually had one sitting around, just waiting for an opportunity to be showcased in the blog! So, without further ado, here's today's writing tip, courtesy of Cia. Enjoy! Adverbs and Adjectives ~ Helping or Hurting by Cia Today I want to focus on ways adverbs and adjectives hurt writing instead of helping. How do we structure sentences to avoid unnecessary phrasing and descriptions, but still keep a story strong visually to the reader? One of the first things that came to mind when I considered this subject was the use of adverbs and adjectives. My personal view on writing is to keep my words from interfering with the story, and that usually requires keeping things as simple as possible. First, for those who haven't had a grammar class in a while, I'll define them. Adverbs and Adjectives are words that describe or modify a noun, verb, adjective, or adverb. They're describing words. But do we need them? Of course we do, to some extent. Describing words do have their place, like when you want to use an adjective to describe a noun. Will a reader 'see' a character better if I say they are wearing dirty jeans and a ripped hoodie than if I said they are wearing jeans and a hoodie? Yes. Dirty and ripped in the sentence describe the clothing and give the character a very different appearance than the reader might otherwise picture. If I need to show that my character is homeless, those two words go a long way in presenting my character. When writing fiction, we try to create a picture for the readers. For that we need adverbs and adjectives. It is hard to write anything without them. Adding useless describing words is easy to do without realizing it, though. Take a look at my first paragraph. 'Unnecessary' 'first' 'personal' 'usually' are all describing words. The trick comes from deciding what type are useful and which ones are not. Are the adverbs and adjectives I used words necessary? Some are, but one I just pointed out is not. Can you find it? Do I need unnecessary to describe phrasing and descriptions? Well, since I want to point out that they don't need to be used, sure. However, did I need 'personal' in front of view? If I take it out, you still see that it is 'my view', so you have to know that its personal, right? In that sentence personal is an adjective I could remove. Those are subtle uses of describing words writers need to consider removing, especially when writing stories with word limits. Some are easy to spot, like icy cold, steaming hot, or running swiftly, transportation vehicle, alternative choices, etc... Others like my personal view, are not quite as easy to pick out but just as redundant. These should be eliminated as often as possible. Another type of adverb to avoid are those that tend to spring up around verbs. Often, they are words like very, typically, carefully, always, just, often, etc... Most of the time, they're not necessary. Other times, they make a phrase clunky or wordy, when changing the verb would work. Examples: Redundant adverb: She always gets a coffee at 3 PM every day or She gets a coffee at 3 PM every day. If she gets the coffee every day at 3 pm, do we really need always there? Redundant adjective: The fundraiser was a complete and total failure or The fundraiser was a total failure. We don't need both complete and total, as they mean the same thing. Redundant adjective: The noisy fan's constant squeaking drove her nuts or The fan's constant squeaking drove her nuts. Do we need noisy to describe the fan when we then describe the noise it is making? Verb changing adverb: He reaches quickly for the falling stack of books or He lunges for the falling stack of books. Here, a more descriptive verb for the movement eliminates the need to use the adverb. Amused by her comment, he just gives her a smile or Amused by her comment, he smiles. Using just gives really isn't necessary when you could change the action to smiles. Both Adverbs and Adjectives: He softly walks into the room, trying not to wake his sleeping wife or He tiptoes into the room, trying not to wake his wife. Here, tiptoeing describes the walking and if he doesn't want to wake her she is obviously sleeping so that word can be removed.
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